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Adding hard drives Partitioning Emergency Boot Floppies Dualboot

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Yum Humor  Etc

Fedora is essentially alpha version of RHEL provided for beta-addicts. There is no patches only upgrades. That makes it different from Debian and Ubuntu.

What is the difference between fedora.us and the Fedora Project at fedora.redhat.com?

Fedora Project at fedora.redhat.com is Red Hat's new community distribution development project. What used to be Red Hat Linux is now the Fedora Project, with the long term goal of creating a community volunteer developed Linux distribution somewhat like Debian, however moving at a faster pace of innovation. During September 2003 fedora.us agreed to merge with Red Hat Linux to become the new Fedora Project. This alliance of corporate engineering and enthused community contributors work together to improve the overall quality of the entire distribution.

Currently the merge is still progressing, with the goal of a full project merge before the release of Fedora Core 2 scheduled for April 2004. After the complete merge, fedora.us packages will exist as Fedora Extras as an official part of the combined Fedora Project.

In the mean time fedora.us continues to operate as an independent project. Our package submission & QA testing procedures strives for the highest level of package quality. fedora.us repositories continue to serve add-ons and upgrades for those add-ons for Red Hat Linux 8.0, 9, and Fedora Core 1. Meanwhile FedoraLegacy supplies security updates to the older distributions no longer supported by Red Hat, Inc.


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NEWS CONTENTS

Old News ;-)

[Oct 01, 2011] Step by Step Enable Root Login on Fedora 11

Many links about enabling root login in Fedora suggest editing only one file /etc/pam.d/gdm. This is incorrect and does not work. Two files should be edited: /etc/pam.d/gdm and /etc/pam.d/gdm-password
GUI Desktop Linux Windows Install Setup Configuration Project

To enable root login, two files: /etc/pam.d/gdm and /etc/pam.d/gdm-password need to be edited

Remove or comment out line by prefixing #.

# auth required pam_succeed_if.so user != root quiet

Save and close the file. Logout from terminal and from GUI itself. Now you should be able login as root user using GDM GUI login manager.



Etc

FAIR USE NOTICE This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit exclusivly for research and educational purposes.   If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. 

ABUSE: IPs or network segments from which we detect a stream of probes might be blocked for no less then 90 days. Multiple types of probes increase this period.  

Society

Groupthink : Two Party System as Polyarchy : Corruption of Regulators : Bureaucracies : Understanding Micromanagers and Control Freaks : Toxic Managers :   Harvard Mafia : Diplomatic Communication : Surviving a Bad Performance Review : Insufficient Retirement Funds as Immanent Problem of Neoliberal Regime : PseudoScience : Who Rules America : Neoliberalism  : The Iron Law of Oligarchy : Libertarian Philosophy

Quotes

War and Peace : Skeptical Finance : John Kenneth Galbraith :Talleyrand : Oscar Wilde : Otto Von Bismarck : Keynes : George Carlin : Skeptics : Propaganda  : SE quotes : Language Design and Programming Quotes : Random IT-related quotesSomerset Maugham : Marcus Aurelius : Kurt Vonnegut : Eric Hoffer : Winston Churchill : Napoleon Bonaparte : Ambrose BierceBernard Shaw : Mark Twain Quotes

Bulletin:

Vol 25, No.12 (December, 2013) Rational Fools vs. Efficient Crooks The efficient markets hypothesis : Political Skeptic Bulletin, 2013 : Unemployment Bulletin, 2010 :  Vol 23, No.10 (October, 2011) An observation about corporate security departments : Slightly Skeptical Euromaydan Chronicles, June 2014 : Greenspan legacy bulletin, 2008 : Vol 25, No.10 (October, 2013) Cryptolocker Trojan (Win32/Crilock.A) : Vol 25, No.08 (August, 2013) Cloud providers as intelligence collection hubs : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2010 : Inequality Bulletin, 2009 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2008 : Copyleft Problems Bulletin, 2004 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2011 : Energy Bulletin, 2010 : Malware Protection Bulletin, 2010 : Vol 26, No.1 (January, 2013) Object-Oriented Cult : Political Skeptic Bulletin, 2011 : Vol 23, No.11 (November, 2011) Softpanorama classification of sysadmin horror stories : Vol 25, No.05 (May, 2013) Corporate bullshit as a communication method  : Vol 25, No.06 (June, 2013) A Note on the Relationship of Brooks Law and Conway Law

History:

Fifty glorious years (1950-2000): the triumph of the US computer engineering : Donald Knuth : TAoCP and its Influence of Computer Science : Richard Stallman : Linus Torvalds  : Larry Wall  : John K. Ousterhout : CTSS : Multix OS Unix History : Unix shell history : VI editor : History of pipes concept : Solaris : MS DOSProgramming Languages History : PL/1 : Simula 67 : C : History of GCC developmentScripting Languages : Perl history   : OS History : Mail : DNS : SSH : CPU Instruction Sets : SPARC systems 1987-2006 : Norton Commander : Norton Utilities : Norton Ghost : Frontpage history : Malware Defense History : GNU Screen : OSS early history

Classic books:

The Peter Principle : Parkinson Law : 1984 : The Mythical Man-MonthHow to Solve It by George Polya : The Art of Computer Programming : The Elements of Programming Style : The Unix Haterís Handbook : The Jargon file : The True Believer : Programming Pearls : The Good Soldier Svejk : The Power Elite

Most popular humor pages:

Manifest of the Softpanorama IT Slacker Society : Ten Commandments of the IT Slackers Society : Computer Humor Collection : BSD Logo Story : The Cuckoo's Egg : IT Slang : C++ Humor : ARE YOU A BBS ADDICT? : The Perl Purity Test : Object oriented programmers of all nations : Financial Humor : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2008 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2010 : The Most Comprehensive Collection of Editor-related Humor : Programming Language Humor : Goldman Sachs related humor : Greenspan humor : C Humor : Scripting Humor : Real Programmers Humor : Web Humor : GPL-related Humor : OFM Humor : Politically Incorrect Humor : IDS Humor : "Linux Sucks" Humor : Russian Musical Humor : Best Russian Programmer Humor : Microsoft plans to buy Catholic Church : Richard Stallman Related Humor : Admin Humor : Perl-related Humor : Linus Torvalds Related humor : PseudoScience Related Humor : Networking Humor : Shell Humor : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2011 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2012 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2013 : Java Humor : Software Engineering Humor : Sun Solaris Related Humor : Education Humor : IBM Humor : Assembler-related Humor : VIM Humor : Computer Viruses Humor : Bright tomorrow is rescheduled to a day after tomorrow : Classic Computer Humor

The Last but not Least


Copyright © 1996-2016 by Dr. Nikolai Bezroukov. www.softpanorama.org was created as a service to the UN Sustainable Development Networking Programme (SDNP) in the author free time. This document is an industrial compilation designed and created exclusively for educational use and is distributed under the Softpanorama Content License.

The site uses AdSense so you need to be aware of Google privacy policy. You you do not want to be tracked by Google please disable Javascript for this site. This site is perfectly usable without Javascript.

Original materials copyright belong to respective owners. Quotes are made for educational purposes only in compliance with the fair use doctrine.

FAIR USE NOTICE This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available to advance understanding of computer science, IT technology, economic, scientific, and social issues. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided by section 107 of the US Copyright Law according to which such material can be distributed without profit exclusively for research and educational purposes.

This is a Spartan WHYFF (We Help You For Free) site written by people for whom English is not a native language. Grammar and spelling errors should be expected. The site contain some broken links as it develops like a living tree...

You can use PayPal to make a contribution, supporting development of this site and speed up access. In case softpanorama.org is down you can use the at softpanorama.info

Disclaimer:

The statements, views and opinions presented on this web page are those of the author (or referenced source) and are not endorsed by, nor do they necessarily reflect, the opinions of the author present and former employers, SDNP or any other organization the author may be associated with. We do not warrant the correctness of the information provided or its fitness for any purpose.

Last modified: September 28, 2017

[Jul 30, 2007] Due to problems on high loads in Linux 2.6.23 kernel the Linux kernel process scheduler has been completely ripped out and replaced with a completely new one called Completely Fair Scheduler (CFS) modeled after Solaris 10 scheduler.

This is will not affect the current Linux distributions (Suse 9, 10 and RHEL 4.x) as they forked the kernel and essentially develop it as a separate tree.

But it will affect any future Red Hat or Suse distribution (Suse 11 and RHEL 6 respectively).

How it will fair in comparison with Solaris 10 remains to be seen:

The main idea of CFS's design can be summed up in a single sentence: CFS basically models an "ideal, precise multi-tasking CPU" on real hardware.

Ideal multi-tasking CPU" is a (non-existent) CPU that has 100% physical power and which can run each task at precise equal speed, in parallel, each at 1/n running speed. For example: if there are 2 tasks running then it runs each at exactly 50% speed.

FedoraNEWS.ORG

Suppose you want to install a development package "mysql-server 4.1.7" from Fedora Development Repo.
First, you need to enable it by changing the option "enabled" from 0 to 1 in fedora-devel.repo file:

[tchung@tchung-fc3 ~]$ sudo vi /etc/yum.repos.d/fedora-devel.repo

[development]
name=Fedora Core $releasever - Development Tree
#baseurl=http://download.fedora.redhat.com/pub/fedora/linux/core/development/$basearch/
mirrorlist=http://fedora.redhat.com/download/mirrors/fedora-core-rawhide
enabled=1

But soon you will notice that it did not install the development package you wanted.
Even if you have imported GPG Public Key for Fedora Base/Updates and Fedora Development/Test packages from Fedora Project.

For installing GPG Public Key for Fedora Base/Updates, see How to install GPG Key for yum in FC3.
For installing GPG Public Key for Fedora Development/Test packages, see Fedora Project GPG Keys page.
("Automated Package Signing" section for Development packages)

Yumex Reins in Fedora Core 3

I recently came across a program, called YUM (Yellow dog Updater, Modified) Extender, which has significantly simplified software management on the Fedora Core 3 machines I maintain.

Yumex, as it's also known, adds a handy graphical interface to YUM, which itself works with the RPM (Red Hat Package Manager) application that handles software management chores on Fedora and several other Linux distributions.

YUM automates package dependency resolution and is a very capable application. However, as a command-line program, YUM takes some time to master.

Yumex is currently at its 0.23 release. It sports a fairly basic interface , but, even so, it offers the best method I've seen yet for juggling numerous YUM software repositories.

Along with the official package sources for Fedora Core 3 -currently the only distribution that Yumex supports-there are various third-party repositories for obtaining the packages that Fedora does not ship with by default. I could create profiles in Yumex to separate, for instance, fetching important core project updates from seeking out third-party packages.

Yumex is written by Tim Lauridsen and is available for free download at linux.rasmil.dk/mambo. If you run Fedora Core 3, it's definitely worth a look.

Before You Begin the Installation

Part of the process of installing Fedora Core (or any operating system for that matter) is to first research how well the new operating system will fit into an existing hardware environment, or if new hardware will be required to host the operating system. The following sections provide some basic points to consider when installing Fedora and augment the checklists and ideas presented in Chapter 2, "Preparing to Install Fedora."

You start by researching and documenting your hardware. This information can prove helpful later on during the installation.

Fedora HOWTO

RPM Repositories

FAQs

Fedora Users FAQ

I have Red Hat Linux 9 (Shrike) installed now. How can I update to Fedora Core 2?

That is an excellent question. Of course you want to avoid the need to burn CDs, and would like to do a simple and reliable online install. And obviously you want to know how to make it work from behind your authenticating proxy that requires a userid and a password. You might be wondering whether it is as simple as pasting the right lines into your /etc/yum.conf file, and running yum -y update. It could be you are on the right track, or maybe not. Hopefully someone in the know will update this page soon to answer your excellent and insightful question.

Hint 1: There are online resources on doing an unsupported and untested upgrade with Yum:

It will be necessary to clean up some parts of the system configuration, because normally the Fedora Core Installer Anaconda would do that during a regular upgrade.

What is fedora.us?

Fedora.us is the authoritative community project for the development of high quality Extras add-on packages for Red Hat Linux and Fedora Core. This community volunteer development of package development is much like the spirit of the Debian community.

What is the difference between fedora.us and the Fedora Project at fedora.redhat.com?

Fedora Project at fedora.redhat.com is Red Hat's new community distribution development project. What used to be Red Hat Linux is now the Fedora Project, with the long term goal of creating a community volunteer developed Linux distribution somewhat like Debian, however moving at a faster pace of innovation. During September 2003 fedora.us agreed to merge with Red Hat Linux to become the new Fedora Project. This alliance of corporate engineering and enthused community contributors work together to improve the overall quality of the entire distribution.

Currently the merge is still progressing, with the goal of a full project merge before the release of Fedora Core 2 scheduled for April 2004. After the complete merge, fedora.us packages will exist as Fedora Extras as an official part of the combined Fedora Project.

In the mean time fedora.us continues to operate as an independent project. Our package & QA testing procedures strives for the highest level of package quality. fedora.us repositories continue to serve add-ons and upgrades for those add-ons for Red Hat Linux 8.0, 9, and Fedora Core 1. Meanwhile FedoraLegacy supplies security updates to the older distributions no longer supported by Red Hat, Inc.

Why use fedora.us?

How do I use fedora.us?

Read the Fedora HOWTO.

How does fedora.us differ from FreshRPMS or other repositories?

Many other repositories like FreshRPMS are made by a single person. Fedora can have a lot more packages, and of higher quality, because we have many package developers working together on a common authoritative repository. It is our belief that collaboratively developed package repositories tend to produce higher quality and reduce the chance of clashes. Other examples of high quality collaborative developed repositories that do not conflict with fedora.us are rpm.livna.org and jpackage.org.

Who started all this Fedora stuff and when?

Founded December 2002 by University of Hawaii Computer Science student Warren Togami, the previous Fedora Linux Project is an international team of volunteer software developers united for the development of high quality 3rd party RPM packages for the Red Hat Linux platform.

The new combined project will bring these benefits of open collaborative development to a larger mainstream audience, with much greater community involvement in the development process.

How do I switch mail programs?

The Unofficial Fedora FAQ

  1. Q: How do I read my NTFS (Windows NT/2000/XP/2003) drive in Fedora?

    A: Well, now, that's an easy one! The wonderful linux-ntfs project has a whole section dedicated to Red Hat and Fedora. If you get lost, just look at the links on the left.

  2. Q: I can't access my Windows network shares anymore! People tell me to use the smbmount command, but it doesn't work! A: Fedora Core 3 uses a cool new type of Windows file sharing called "The Common Internet File System" (CIFS). Instead of using "smbmount", try:

    mount -t cifs //computername/share /mnt/somedirectory

    For more information about this, in a terminal you can do:

    man mount.cifs

  3. Q: How do I get Wine to work? A: There are RPMs that work out-of-the-box at NewRPMs. Go to the NewRPMs Fedora Repository and get whichever wine RPM has been posted most recently (check the date next to the file), and try installing it. (Thanks to che for the tip.)
  4. Q: Where is the floppy disk install image for Fedora Core 3? A: The new 2.6 kernel in Fedora Core 2 can't fit on a floppy disk. So, you can't boot or install from a floppy. However, you can install from a CD, hard drive, or even USB disk (if your computer supports booting from a USB disk).

    If you can only use a floppy, you have a few choices:

    (Thanks to Noa Resare for suggesting this question and giving me some good sample text.)

Yum

How do I install software for Fedora? (How to use yum or an RPM)

    A: The easiest way to install software in Fedora is to use yum.
    1. Download this yum.conf.
    2. Replace your "/etc/yum.conf" with the one you downloaded. You will need to be root to do that. In fact, you need to be root to do any of the following.

    NOTE: Not all software is available for Fedora Core 3, yet. Some of the repos are still catching up with the recent release of Fedora Core 3.

    Note that the yum.conf provided here is updated from time to time, for various reasons.

    Now, you can see a list of the available software:

    yum list available



Etc

FAIR USE NOTICE This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit exclusivly for research and educational purposes.   If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. 

ABUSE: IPs or network segments from which we detect a stream of probes might be blocked for no less then 90 days. Multiple types of probes increase this period.  

Society

Groupthink : Two Party System as Polyarchy : Corruption of Regulators : Bureaucracies : Understanding Micromanagers and Control Freaks : Toxic Managers :   Harvard Mafia : Diplomatic Communication : Surviving a Bad Performance Review : Insufficient Retirement Funds as Immanent Problem of Neoliberal Regime : PseudoScience : Who Rules America : Neoliberalism  : The Iron Law of Oligarchy : Libertarian Philosophy

Quotes

War and Peace : Skeptical Finance : John Kenneth Galbraith :Talleyrand : Oscar Wilde : Otto Von Bismarck : Keynes : George Carlin : Skeptics : Propaganda  : SE quotes : Language Design and Programming Quotes : Random IT-related quotesSomerset Maugham : Marcus Aurelius : Kurt Vonnegut : Eric Hoffer : Winston Churchill : Napoleon Bonaparte : Ambrose BierceBernard Shaw : Mark Twain Quotes

Bulletin:

Vol 25, No.12 (December, 2013) Rational Fools vs. Efficient Crooks The efficient markets hypothesis : Political Skeptic Bulletin, 2013 : Unemployment Bulletin, 2010 :  Vol 23, No.10 (October, 2011) An observation about corporate security departments : Slightly Skeptical Euromaydan Chronicles, June 2014 : Greenspan legacy bulletin, 2008 : Vol 25, No.10 (October, 2013) Cryptolocker Trojan (Win32/Crilock.A) : Vol 25, No.08 (August, 2013) Cloud providers as intelligence collection hubs : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2010 : Inequality Bulletin, 2009 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2008 : Copyleft Problems Bulletin, 2004 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2011 : Energy Bulletin, 2010 : Malware Protection Bulletin, 2010 : Vol 26, No.1 (January, 2013) Object-Oriented Cult : Political Skeptic Bulletin, 2011 : Vol 23, No.11 (November, 2011) Softpanorama classification of sysadmin horror stories : Vol 25, No.05 (May, 2013) Corporate bullshit as a communication method  : Vol 25, No.06 (June, 2013) A Note on the Relationship of Brooks Law and Conway Law

History:

Fifty glorious years (1950-2000): the triumph of the US computer engineering : Donald Knuth : TAoCP and its Influence of Computer Science : Richard Stallman : Linus Torvalds  : Larry Wall  : John K. Ousterhout : CTSS : Multix OS Unix History : Unix shell history : VI editor : History of pipes concept : Solaris : MS DOSProgramming Languages History : PL/1 : Simula 67 : C : History of GCC developmentScripting Languages : Perl history   : OS History : Mail : DNS : SSH : CPU Instruction Sets : SPARC systems 1987-2006 : Norton Commander : Norton Utilities : Norton Ghost : Frontpage history : Malware Defense History : GNU Screen : OSS early history

Classic books:

The Peter Principle : Parkinson Law : 1984 : The Mythical Man-MonthHow to Solve It by George Polya : The Art of Computer Programming : The Elements of Programming Style : The Unix Haterís Handbook : The Jargon file : The True Believer : Programming Pearls : The Good Soldier Svejk : The Power Elite

Most popular humor pages:

Manifest of the Softpanorama IT Slacker Society : Ten Commandments of the IT Slackers Society : Computer Humor Collection : BSD Logo Story : The Cuckoo's Egg : IT Slang : C++ Humor : ARE YOU A BBS ADDICT? : The Perl Purity Test : Object oriented programmers of all nations : Financial Humor : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2008 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2010 : The Most Comprehensive Collection of Editor-related Humor : Programming Language Humor : Goldman Sachs related humor : Greenspan humor : C Humor : Scripting Humor : Real Programmers Humor : Web Humor : GPL-related Humor : OFM Humor : Politically Incorrect Humor : IDS Humor : "Linux Sucks" Humor : Russian Musical Humor : Best Russian Programmer Humor : Microsoft plans to buy Catholic Church : Richard Stallman Related Humor : Admin Humor : Perl-related Humor : Linus Torvalds Related humor : PseudoScience Related Humor : Networking Humor : Shell Humor : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2011 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2012 : Financial Humor Bulletin, 2013 : Java Humor : Software Engineering Humor : Sun Solaris Related Humor : Education Humor : IBM Humor : Assembler-related Humor : VIM Humor : Computer Viruses Humor : Bright tomorrow is rescheduled to a day after tomorrow : Classic Computer Humor

The Last but not Least


Copyright © 1996-2016 by Dr. Nikolai Bezroukov. www.softpanorama.org was created as a service to the UN Sustainable Development Networking Programme (SDNP) in the author free time. This document is an industrial compilation designed and created exclusively for educational use and is distributed under the Softpanorama Content License.

The site uses AdSense so you need to be aware of Google privacy policy. You you do not want to be tracked by Google please disable Javascript for this site. This site is perfectly usable without Javascript.

Original materials copyright belong to respective owners. Quotes are made for educational purposes only in compliance with the fair use doctrine.

FAIR USE NOTICE This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available to advance understanding of computer science, IT technology, economic, scientific, and social issues. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided by section 107 of the US Copyright Law according to which such material can be distributed without profit exclusively for research and educational purposes.

This is a Spartan WHYFF (We Help You For Free) site written by people for whom English is not a native language. Grammar and spelling errors should be expected. The site contain some broken links as it develops like a living tree...

You can use PayPal to make a contribution, supporting development of this site and speed up access. In case softpanorama.org is down you can use the at softpanorama.info

Disclaimer:

The statements, views and opinions presented on this web page are those of the author (or referenced source) and are not endorsed by, nor do they necessarily reflect, the opinions of the author present and former employers, SDNP or any other organization the author may be associated with. We do not warrant the correctness of the information provided or its fitness for any purpose.

Last modified: September, 28, 2017